Pitchapalooza Success!

Categories: News

Thanks to everyone who attended our second Workman Community Event! It was a night of firsts: The first time Pitchapalooza had been hosted inside a publishing house. The first time guest panelist and Publisher of Algonquin Books Elisabeth Scharlatt appeared as a Pitchapalooza judge. And, at the end of the night, the first time in Pitchapalooza history that the judges crowned not one, not two, but three winners! For the full rundown (and the winners), check out what the Wall Street Journal had to say about it.

Pitch5 workman

The one-minute pitches were flying and the judges’ advice spot-on, while Savannah and I tried our best to keep up–and keep their nuggets of brilliance to 140 characters or less (look for our tweets with the hashtag #pitchapalooza if you’d like a refresher)….

Pitch7 workman

For those who were seeking out the unabridged version (forget 140 characters, the book has 4 times that in pages!), Workman’s Leslie Fannon was there to take orders.

Pitch2 workman

Stay tuned for the next Workman Community Event…any special requests for future ones?  Leave ‘em in the comments.

 

No Comments
Posted by at 10:43 am
Tags: , , , ,
Bookmark and Share


-----------30-----------

The Founding Fathers, Deconstructed: Benjamin Franklin

Categories: News

Happy Independence Day! Before you watch the fireworks and dump your enemy’s tea into the nearest body of water, let’s round out our three-part series on name history with a Founding Father known for his love of language. A northerner, while we’re at it (sorry Thomas Jefferson, or rather “Twin Son-of-Jeffery”) with a particular etymological connection to a cherished modern Fourth of July tradition:

Benjamin Franklin

Benjamin is derived from a Hebrew name meaning “son of the south” or “son of the right hand”; its progenitor, the youngest son of Jacob, is a figure in the Bible, Quran and Torah. The first syllable ben literally means “son of”, and its modern variations (such as “ben”, “bin” and “ibn”) are commonly used in Semitic surnames. The rest of the name stems from yamin, which means both “south” and “right hand”. We don’t have too many English words from this root, but a quick map check will confirm that the southernmost Arab state is, well, Yemen.

Franklin is also etymologically related to an Old World country, this time the more obvious France. Both the name and the nation are rooted in the Franks, an ancient Germanic horde known for their incredible might (unlike those other, not-mighty Germanic hordes). Their many descendants included the Normans, who kept up the family tradition by conquering England in 1066 (thanks high school!) and subjugating the locals for a few centuries. It got to the point where the Middle English directly referred to the Franks in its term for a free landholder, frankelin; Modern English eventually expunged the extraneous e. This means two things for America:

-Benjamin Franklin’s obsession with freedom is echoed in his name, and more importantly

-Freedom has a concrete linguistic link with hot dogs, as the original term ‘frankfurter’ stems from the German city of Frankfurt, which literally means “Ford of the Franks”.

So fire up those grills, and whether it’s halal, kosher, tofu or pork, know that you’re eating the delicious food of liberty.

-Jay

No Comments
Posted by at 11:11 am
Tags: , , ,
Bookmark and Share


-----------30-----------

The Founding Fathers, Deconstructed: Patrick Henry

Categories: News

Time for Round Two of our look into the etymology of the Founding Fathers’ names! Yesterday we researched George Washington, and today we’re focusing on a fellow Virginian, governor and orator Patrick Henry. Will the man who gave us “Give me liberty or give me death!”, “If this be treason, make the most of it!” and other famous shouts have a name that lives up to his legacy? Find out below, and check in tomorrow for our final installment!

Patrick Henry

Patrick is a descendant of the Latin name Patricius, meaning “nobleman” (or, more accurately and evidently, “patrician”). At first this may seem ill-suited for a champion of republicanism, but if we delve deeper we find that a patricius was meant to act as a fatherly figure to those beneath him; you might recognize the “father” aspect in more familiar words, like “patriarch” and “paternal” (although funnily enough, the term “patronizing” looped back to having an elitist connotation in the eighteenth century).

The word “father” itself shares an ancient root with patricius, the Proto-Indo-European pater (the approximations of plosives like ‘p’ in Proto-Indo-European often split off to become fricatives like ‘f’ when becoming Romantic and Germanic languages, as seen in the Romantic roots patr-, frag- and pter- versus the Germanic father, break and feather).

So we can connect one of the Founding Fathers with the actual word “father”, which is pretty neat. But what’s even cooler is that Patrick is more directly related to an equally apt term: patriot.

Henry comes from the German Heinrich, itself from the Old High German Heimerich, an easily-split name meaning “home ruler” (heim meaning “home”, rich deriving from rihhi, meaning “ruler”). The first half is related to the English word “home” (surprise!), but also “haunt”, stemming from the word’s original denotation as a frequently-visited place; the ghostly undertones didn’t come about until the nineteenth century.

The latter half, rihhi, is part of a rich global family. On the Germanic side this includes the word “rich” itself, as well as “right” and the unfortunately-connoted “Reich”. But going back to its Proto-Indo-European root reg gives us a connection to the Latin regere (meaning “to rule”) from which we get ruler words like “regal”, “reign”, “regime”, “regulate”, “region” and “Regis Philbin”; we also have the Sanskrit raj and raja, which made their way to the English lexicon through India.

What I’m getting at is, there’s a lot of history crammed into the last two letters of Henry.

All in all, you can see Patrick Henry’s full name in two ways: either it’s incredibly ironic that the anti-monarchist’s name essentially means “nobleman king”, or the Virginia governor is perfectly described as a “patriotic/fatherly leader of the home”.

-Jay

No Comments
Posted by at 10:17 am
Tags: ,
Bookmark and Share


-----------30-----------

The Founding Fathers, Deconstructed: George Washington

Categories: News

[Ed's note: We're very excited to introduce a fantastic Founding Fathers mini-series in honor of the 4th of July, penned by our summer intern and etymology enthusiast, Jay Lyon. George Washington, as the first elected president of the United States, seems like a great guy (and name) to start with, don't you think? Stay tuned for Patrick Henry tomorrow, followed by....?]

George Washington:

George (alongside its many counterparts, such as Jorge, Georges, Giorgio and Yuri) stems from the Ancient Greek word for farmer; a fitting moniker for our agrarian first president. This Greek root, georgos, itself derives from ge (earth) and ergon (work).

The words most visibly related to George are “geography”, “geology”, “geometry” and pretty much anything with “geo” anywhere near it. But from the ergon half we get words like “organ”, “urge”, “surgery” and anything that ends in “-ergy” (like energy, synergy and allergy).

Despite its similar structure, the word “gorge” comes from an entirely different root meaning “to swallow” (the same root as one of my favorite etymological pairings, “gargle” and “gargoyle”, both of which have to do with spouting from the throat) and has nothing to do with George.

Washington originates from a British town of the same name, which according to the Online Etymology Dictionary literally translates to “estate of a man named Wassa”. No word on who Wassa was, or what Wassa means (other than the presumably unrelated West African ethnic group of the same name), but the most important thing this tells us is that the capital of the United States is a town that’s named for a person that’s named for a town that’s named for a person.

-Jay

No Comments
Posted by at 5:31 pm
Tags: , , ,
Bookmark and Share


-----------30-----------

Recipe: Jalapeno-Spiked Bourbon Julep

Categories: Cookbooks, Recipes

Though the threat of a national bourbon shortage points to a recent surge in the whiskey’s popularity, there are those detractors who think of it as a heavy, cloying sort of  liquor. Cutting the traditional Mint Julep with an unorthodox kick of Jalapeño is the perfect answer to their qualms. Recipe via chef Edward Lee (who has never met a bourbon he didn’t like), from his stunning new cookbook  Smoke and Pickles.

 

SmokeandPickles_pg223
 
Mint juleps are a part of the Derby celebrations, and everyone partakes in the ritual. But, to be honest, most juleps I’ve had are overly sweet, cloying, and hard to finish. This is my twist on the julep: It’s minty and verdant, with a kick of spice at the end that makes you want another sip. Serve this in pewter or silver julep cups, and drink it outside on a porch sheltered by a magnolia tree.
 

Continue Reading »

No Comments
Posted by at 9:47 am
Tags: , ,
Bookmark and Share


-----------30-----------

Get to know Superman, Lois Lane and General Zod with DC Comics Fandex

Categories: News

The new Superman movie (Man of Steel) is in theaters now – exploring the history behind Superman lore.

Find out more about Superman, Lois Lane and General Zod in these excerpted pages from DC COMICS SUPER HEROES AND VILLAINS, available at a store near you or at one of these online retailers:
Amazon | Barnes & Noble | IndieBound | Workman

Superman from Fandex with footer

Lois Lane from Fandex with footer

General Zod from Fandex with footer

No Comments
Posted by at 12:42 pm
Tags:
Bookmark and Share


-----------30-----------

Maya Angelou Likes to Laugh

Categories: News

If Maya Angelou starts a book club, can I be a part of it? In a recent interview in the New York Times, Ms. Angelou shared that she’s reading Interventions: A Life in War and Peace by Kofi Annan, rereading “The Raven” and other poems by Edgar Allen Poe, and for a lighter take on life, a little gem from our own shelves titled, Children’s Letters to God by Stu Hample. She says,

Whenever I want to laugh, I read a wonderful book, Children’s Letters to God. You can open it anywhere. One I read recently said, “Dear God, thank you for the baby brother, but what I prayed for was a puppy.”

Here are a few more fervent wishes, confessions, confidences, praise, and thanks from Children’s Letters to God:

Dear God,
Are you really invisible or is that just a trick?
Lucy

Dear God,
Did you mean for giraffe to look like that or was it an accident?
Norma

Dear God,
I think the stapler is one of your greatest inventions.
Ruth M.

Dear God,
In bible times did they really talk that fancy?
Jennifer

Dear God,
I went to this wedding and they kissed right in church. Is that OK?
Neil

No Comments
Posted by at 11:19 am
Tags: , , , , ,
Bookmark and Share


-----------30-----------

Live By the Book: Made By Dad #fathersday

Categories: Fun and games, Live By the Book

Just (barely) in time for Father’s Day, here’s a Live By the Book style guide inspired by Made By Dad: 67 Blureprints for Making Cool Stuff by Scott Bedford. Scroll down to check out our list of 17 awesome gifts for dad (neckties not included!), including one free downloadable one.

Live By the Book: Made By Dad

FATHER’S DAY GIFT GUIDE: 17 Gift Ideas for Awesome Dads

1. FREE Printable Father’s Day “My Hero” Badge: Just download, print, color in, and cut out!
2. Makey Makey: Only the coolest thing ever. All creative, musical, and engineer minded dads deserve this gift. With just the tiniest bit of coding you can make sounds out of anything. Banana pianos. Video game controllers out of carrots!
3. Baseball Glove Oven Mitt:
This potholder looks just like a broken-in, traditional leather baseball glove! Perfect for the sports fan-chef dad in your life. He’ll feel like you’re catching a pitch so fast that it’s on fire.
4.
FitBit FLEX: From timing a nap to counting calories and steps on a run, this band will help get Dad in motion; he’ll be amazed at how many steps it takes to just chase after the kids.
5.
Custom Guitar Pick: A sweet, personable note for each time he strikes a tune.
6. Pixel Geek Glasses: Fake specs, for the goofy, geeky, gamer father.
7. Protective Eyewear: Safety first! Let your DIY dad know that you care about him–and his eyesight.
8. Zombie Air Shark: Let Dad patrol his man cave or workshop with his very own remote controlled air shark. Just think, it could be Shark Week every week!
9. Skateboard Chair: Is Dad in need of a new workshop seat? Made out of old decks for the skater boy at heart.
10. Mustache Mug: A little more of a classic father’s day gift, quirky and cute, he’ll think of you whenever he takes a sip.
11. Arduino Starter Kit For the mad dad scientist, this is the hobby of the future!
12. Sugru Hacking Putty: From Arduino projects (see above) to creating container seals and marking tools and power plugs, this is like advanced duct tape-only way stronger and more permanent!
13. Handmade Shaving Kit: Let’s (ahem) face it, Dad is the one responsible for sporting the majority of facial hair of the family, let’s get him shaving in style.
14. Beer Making Kit: Tried and true, this gift will have the beer drinking DIY dad giddy as a college kid at a kegger!
15. Bare Conductive Card Kit: Give him a card that will really light up his smile, with this conductive card kit, you’ll learn about basic conductivity through use of conductive paint, LEDs, and simple batteries. A fun educational project to do with the kids!
16. Sharpie Pens: For the dad who wants to make a mark–like this guy.
17. MADE BY DAD: 67 Blueprints for Making Cool Stuff: For dads who want to hang with their awesome kids and make cool stuff together.

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY!

No Comments
Posted by at 11:18 am
Tags: , , , , , , , ,
Bookmark and Share


-----------30-----------

Regional Grilling and BBQ Around the USA with Steven Raichlen and John T. Edge!

Categories: News

Are you a fan of BBQ? Let Steven Raichlen & John T Edge take you around the USA to explore regional grilling & BBQ! Tweet using the #BBQUSA hashtag, and send in your tips or questions for Steven & John T. Your tweet will qualify as an entry for a chance to win a regional grilling prize pack, which includes a copy of John T’s The Truck Food Cookbook, a meat rub and thermometer from Steven Raichlen’s Best of Barbecue, and an eBook copy of Steven’s BBQ USA!

On Wednesday 6/26/2013 at 8pm ET/7PM CT, we will announce the winners during a live Twitter chat with Steven (@sraichlen) and John T (@johntedge). Follow the chat with the hashtag #BBQUSA and get the answers to all of your questions & more!

BBQ USA June 2013

To enter the #TruckFoodCookbook contest, follow these steps:

  1. Follow WorkmanPub on Twitter (so we can contact you via DM if you win!).
  2. Tweet using the #BBQUSA hashtag with your tips or questions on regional grilling or BBQ (i.e. Where can you get the best ribs in the USA?)! Both qualify as an entry for a chance to win. Entries must be received between 12:00 noon ET on 6/14/2013 and 9:00 pm ET on 6/26/2013.
  3. Each Twitter account is allowed multiple entries – keep entering!
  4. Join the live Twitter chat with with Steven Raichlen (@sraichlen) and John T Edge (@johntedge) on Wednesday 6/26/2013 at 8pm ET/7PM CT with the hashtag #BBQUSA, to find out if you’ve won!

 

For official rules, click here.

No Comments
Posted by at 5:12 pm
Tags:
Bookmark and Share


-----------30-----------

Writers, Come Pitch Your Book Ideas!

Categories: News

***UPDATE: THANKS TO AN OVERWHELMING RESPONSE, THIS EVENT HAS REACHED CAPACITY. WE ARE NO LONGER ACCEPTING RSVPS, BUT PLEASE ENTER YOUR NAME AND EMAIL ADDRESS HERE TO BE NOTIFIED OF FUTURE WORKMAN COMMUNITY EVENTS, INCLUDING PITCHAPALOOZAS.****

Pitchapalooza Invite

JUNE 27, 2013•5:30PM

225 Varick Street, New York, NY

CLICK HERE TO RSVP.

Continue Reading »

No Comments
Posted by at 11:36 am
Tags:
Bookmark and Share


-----------30-----------
« Older Posts
Newer Posts »