Workman Goes Underground

Categories: News

What do these three books have in common? (Besides being published by Workman…)

    

They were all spotted (by moi) over a period of 2 days last week on the New York City subway system!

Leaving work, riding the F train from West 4th street, the young lady sitting next to me was reading Can I Wear My Nose Ring to the Interview?* by Ellen Gordon Reeves (*hard to spot since the “vintage” copy below has since been re-jacketed — check out that smashing the new green cover above!). Ooh, and all those post-it notes on the pages! Good luck, subway-riding-lady — we hope you get the job!

Many of you have sent in reports from all over the city after seeing Missed Connections artist Sophie Blackall‘s poster art on several train lines. This shot was also on the F train, when it came above ground at the closed-for-renovations Smith & 9th Street stop.

And on the Manhattan-bound D train the next morning, the doors opened to let passengers on and off at Grand Street, and this was the view! The What to Expect When You’re Expecting movie (inspired by Heidi Murkoff’s pregnancy bible) is “due” May 18.

And what else mama-related is just around the corner? Oh, right: Happy Mother’s Day to all you mamas out there!

Have you spotted any Workman books in your recent travels? In window displays at your favorite neighborhood bookstore, at an airport kiosk, in a contented reader’s hands on a morning commute? Post your photos to our Facebook page!

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Plunder Underground! Larcenist Lusts After Artist’s Subway Sketch

Categories: News

Photo by Librado Romero/The New York Times

If you’ve ridden a New York City subway lately, maybe you’ve noticed an elongated illustration depicting a wide array of commuters. The print is by Sophie Blackall, our very own author of Missed Connections, and it’s part of the MTA’s Arts for Transit initiative. This weekend, according to news reports, one subway rider admired the illustration so much that he tried to steal it, with a screwdriver! He was quickly nabbed by a plainclothes police officer who happened to be standing nearby. Ms. Blackall was flattered by the attempted heist, but other fans should note that there are more lawful ways to obtain her work: the print itself is available at the Transit Museum’s store, and Missed Connections, a collection of illustrated love stories, can be found at bookstores everywhere.

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Don’t Miss Your Connection! Join Sophie Blackall for a Valentine’s Day Celebration

Categories: Authors on tour, Events, Holiday, News

Who: Brooklyn artist and Missed Connections author Sophie Blackall
What:
A Love-in-Transit Party
Where: New York Transit Museum
Boerum Place and Schermerhorn Street, Brooklyn Heights
When: Tuesday, February 14, 6–8 PM
Why: Valentine’s Day!

(Click the flyer below or right here for a larger version.)Meet your missed connection at the NY Transit Museum!

Sophie Blackall is an illustrator and author who lives in Brooklyn. Her latest book is Missed Connections, in which she illustrated the most intriguing “missed connections” listings that she found on Craigslist.

P.S. Hey commuters: Have you seen Sophie’s beautiful art in the subways yet?

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This Valentine’s Day, Find Your Missed Connection…Underground!

Categories: Authors on tour, Events, Holiday, News

Who: Brooklyn artist and Missed Connections author Sophie Blackall
What:
A Love-in-Transit Party
Where: New York Transit Museum
Boerum Place and Schermerhorn Street, Brooklyn Heights
When: Tuesday, February 14, 6–8 PM
Why: Valentine’s Day!

(Click the flyer below or right here for a larger version.)Meet your missed connection at the NY Transit Museum!

Sophie Blackall is an illustrator and author who lives in Brooklyn. Her latest book is Missed Connections, in which she illustrated the most intriguing “missed connections” listings that she found on Craigslist.

P.S. Hey commuters: Have you seen Sophie’s beautiful art in the subways yet?

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Join “Missed Connections” Artist Sophie Blackall for True Stories of Love, Lost & Found

Categories: Authors on tour, Booksellers, Events

Have you ever locked eyes with a handsome stranger while pushing your cart through the produce aisle, but been unable to think of something charming to say? Have you ever ridden next to someone cute on the subway, only to watch her get off at her stop before you could pluck up the courage to ask her name? Have you ever had a moment, but missed the connection?

Join us at the launch party for Brooklyn artist Sophie Blackall’s new book, Missed Connections. Sophie will discuss her art and the inspiration behind the book, and then audience members will be invited to share their own missed connections stories. You can visit WORD’s website for more information, and RSVP on Facebook.

When: Thursday, October 6, at 7 PM
Where: WORD Bookstore: 126 Franklin Street in Brooklyn, NY

Plus: Feeling inspired by Sophie’s project? Share your missed connection story with Time Out New York and enter for a chance to win an original signed illustration by Sophie Blackall—an illustration of your story! The winner will also receive a copy of the book, as will two runners-up. Contest ends today, October 5!!

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Missed ConnectionsBrooklyn artist Sophie Blackall found inspiration among stories of lost opportunities when she discovered the Missed Connections section on Craigslist. Enthralled by the idea of strangers seeking out strangers based solely on a single shared moment, she decided to illustrate her favorite entries, compiling her beautiful watercolors first on her popular blog and now in a wonderful book, Missed Connections: Love, Lost & Found.

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Summer Hours Bring Fall Showers — of Books!

Categories: News

From a giant wall of oversize book dummies at the Workman booth at BEA….

…to real-life, actual page-flippin’, hold-in-your-hand books! It’s fall, which means that we’re starting to see the fruits of our summer labor parade their way from printing houses to warehouses to bookstores to READERS! (Yes, after all these years in the book business we still get giddy over the prospect.)

When Parents Text, Bananagrams On-the-Go!, the Book of All-Time Stupidest Top 10 Lists, and 10-Minute Crossword Puzzles have already made appearances in our offices, and The Best of the Rejection Collection, The Big Book of Visual Sudoku, Missed Connections, How to Feed a Hungry Giant, and even advance copies of Embroider Everything Workshop are due to land this month! It’s enough to make me start thinking about Christmas shopping…

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A Q&A with Sophie Blackall, illustrator of Missed Connections: Love, Lost & Found

Categories: News

Missed ConnectionsQ & A with Sophie Blackall, author of MISSED CONNECTIONS: Love, Lost & Found

Q: How do you choose which Missed Connections listings to illustrate?
A: I glean Missed Connections a few times a week, and it’s all about the subject line. I look for the lyrical, “Billowy Red Scarf Girl,” or the funny, “Hipster Chick Who Passed Gas” (pages 54–55), the unintentionally funny, “Looking for the Hot Girl in the Pink Dress,” ones that immediately suggest images, “Furry Arms in Morning Lecture” (pages 74–75), or the plain odd, “Seeking Girl Who Bit Me TWICE” (pages 112–113). I look for ambiguous messages to illustrate. I like some detail but not too much detail. I dismiss posts where one or other of the couple was wearing anything named by brand, or, you know, baseball caps or sweat pants, because I don’t like drawing them. On the other hand, I’m drawn to top hats, and spats, and moustaches. I haven’t read a Missed Connection yet with someone wearing a monocle but, rest assured, I’ll snap it up if I do.

After I’ve harvested a bunch of messages, I let them settle and see which images float to the surface. By the time I sit down to draw, the picture is almost fully formed in my head. The original messages seem, for the most part, brief and spontaneous and uninhibited and I want my drawings to mirror that…they shouldn’t feel labored.

Q: Have you ever been in touch with any of the people you have painted?
A: Yes! A couple of times. The woman with “Long Curly Brown Hair on the Q” (pages 24–25) saw my illustration and wrote to me, as did the “Floral Print Jacket on the L” (pages 36–37). The fellow who wrote the post about sharing a bear suit with a girl at a party (pages 20–21) e-mailed me, which was kind of thrilling. He sent a photo taken that night, and that was a dreamlike experience. But even though I’ve now seen the “real” bear suit, my image of it feels real to me, and his photo the interpretation. There’s arrogance for you!

Many people wrote claiming the girl with the “Scrabble Tattoo on Roof” (pages 96–97) was their dear friend and, fairly recently, one of those friends reconstructed and photographed the scene, based on my version of it, which was incredibly surreal.

This scene was also reconstructed in a Radar short film about my project.

So now there are four versions of this moment in time in existence: the real one, my painting, the film made with actors, and the photograph based on the painting with the real people from the original event. It’s hard to wrap my head around.

Q: Based on your observations, what type of people do you think post Missed Connections ads?
A: I haven’t done a scientific analysis of this by any means, but Missed Connections are popular with straight and gay men and women, mostly between 20 and 35. Men posting Missed Connections seem to outnumber women posting, roughly 70 to 30. Occasionally, older people post, often looking for old flames and lost loves. Most messages express the writer’s personal regret at not being bolder and for missing an opportunity. They’re written as a shot in the dark, a small missive filled with hope for a second chance. But many messages are just thanking a stranger for a kindness…I love those because I imagine everyone else reading them feels encouraged by these little examples of humanity and generosity and tenderness. There are also more than a few messages from lonely people wondering why they never find themselves described—I illustrated one, “How Come No-one Ever ‘Misses’ Me?” (pages 66–67). They kill me, those.

Q: Which illustrations in this book are your favorites and which, from your blog, do people seem to respond to the most?
A: “We Shared a Bear Suit” (pages 20–21) is a perennial favorite as is “Girl with the Golden Swan Bike” (pages 86–87) and “When I Put Your Coat Collar Up” (pages 114–115). There’s something especially romantic about that last one, but I think my all-time favorite is “We Shared a Bear Suit.” The two people in the image each have part of the bear; each is incomplete. They clearly belong together.

Q: Where do most Missed Connections seem to occur?
A: Missed Connections take place on street corners and elevators, in emergency rooms and dog runs, in line at the grocery store and at Laundromats. Basically everywhere human beings collide, but especially in places where we are forced to stay still a while. Waiting rooms and airport lounges and every form of public transport.

In New York City there are hundreds and hundreds of Missed Connections posted every day, and thousands more that go undocumented. A good many of these seem to happen on the subway, and a disproportionate number of those on the L train. Or perhaps the L train riders are just more likely to post and read Missed Connections. I once read a message which said, “I am going to change to the L train so I can have a Missed Connection too.”

Q: Missed Connections classifieds are abundant and widely followed, even by those who do not post them. Why do you think they are so popular?
A: Missed Connections are small glimpses into strangers’ lives. They are packed with mystery, pathos, beauty, and humor. I know it’s not a New York phenomenon, but somehow it seems the perfect product of this city— people seeking intimacy in a crowd. Sitting on the subway, I’m always wondering what’s going on inside people’s heads, and Missed Connections posts give me the opportunity to find out. There’s more than a little voyeurism going on. I’m sure other people are drawn to them for the same reasons, but I think on some subliminal level there’s a vague desire to recognize ourselves as the person “missed.” It’s nice to know that people are looking at each other so attentively and even tenderly, noticing and appreciating details. That we’re not just a swarm. I think most people find Missed Connections enormously hopeful and romantic.

Q: You moved to Brooklyn, New York, from Australia in 2000. Do you find that the popularity of Missed Connections classifieds and, perhaps, the accompanying cultural fixation with love at first sight is mostly an American thing or have you seen traces of it internationally?
A: I think it’s universal. There are Missed Connections equivalents in London newspapers and I have given interviews on the subject for Italian, Norwegian, Swedish, Brazilian, and Israeli magazines and newspapers, which would suggest the theme has global interest! And of course, the Missed Connection itself is not new. For centuries the lovelorn have carved messages in tree trunks and rolled letters into bottles and cast them out to sea.

Q: What has the experience of illustrating Missed Connections classifieds, and creating this book, taught you about the nature of love?
A: Love at first sight is almost entirely visual. In most cases we don’t even hear the other’s voice. I think there’s a lot to be said for this. We can fill in the blanks and create our own particular knight in shining armor. I’m not an idiot: In the long run, knowing someone intimately and caring for them deeply leaves love at first sight for dead. Clichéd as it is, it’s a wonderful thing to have someone you love bring you a cup of tea when you have a cold, or curl up with you to watch a film on a rainy night, or turn on the oven while you knead the dough. Some of us find that person early on; for the rest of us there’s the hope of a second chance. And that hope can linger a long, long time.

We have only one life, and we rush through it pretty quickly. We make choices and follow paths and we don’t linger too long at crossroads. Moments of intimacy with strangers are minor detours we rarely explore, but those moments make us feel alive, and human, and part of something greater than ourselves. They connect us to each other.


Missed ConnectionsMISSED CONNECTIONS: Love Lost & Found
October 2011
$13.95
Paperback Original

CONTACT:
Rebecca Carlisle, Senior Publicist
Workman Publishing
(212) 614-7596
rebecca@workman.com

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